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BIG EIGHTS
BORN IN 1939?
BORN IN 1940?
BORN IN 1941?
BORN IN 1942?
BORN IN 1943?
BORN IN 1944?
BORN IN 1945?
BORN IN 1946?
BORN IN 1947?
BORN IN 1948?
BORN IN 1949?
BORN IN 1950?
BORN IN 1951?
BORN IN 1952
BORN IN 1953
BORN IN 1954?
BORN IN 1955?
BORN IN 1956?
BORN IN 1957?
BORN IN 1958?
BORN IN 1959?
BORN IN 1960?
BORN IN 1961?
BORN IN 1962
BORN IN 1963?
BORN IN 1964?
BORN IN 1965?
BORN IN 1966?
BORN IN 1967?
BORN IN 1968?
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Direct from BOOM BOOKS. Payment by Direct (Bank) Deposit: Price is $12, post free.  You make payment to BSB 650000, a/c 519918301. You need to notify me at email@boombooks.biz that payment has been made, and give the address of the consignee.  Add an extra $6 per book for Express Post. 

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In 1948, there was no shortage or rationing and regulation, as the Labor Government tried to convince voters that war-time restrictions should continue into the future.   The concept of free medicine was introduced, but doctors (still controlled from Britain), would not co-operate, so medicines on the cheap were scarcely available to the public.  Immigration Minister, Arthur Calwell, was staunchly supporting our White Australia Policy. Would he allow just five select migrants per year from each Asian country? No way.  He was doing his best to kick out Asians who had been allowed in during the War.

In 1958, the Catholic Church bought a big city pub and raffled it; this peeved some people. Circuses were losing animals at a great rate. Officials were in hot water because the Queen Mother wasn't given a sun shade; it didn't worry the lined-up school children, they just fainted as normal. School milk was hot news, bread home deliveries were under fire. The RSPCA was killing dogs in a gas chamber. A tribe pointed the bone at Albert Namatjira; he died soon after.  The first of these new gadgets called computers were bobbing up.  But don't worry. They are just an American fad, and won't last.

In 1968, Sydney had its teeth fluoridated, its sobriety tested for alcohol with breathalisers, and its first Kentucky Fried.  And its first heart transplant.  At the same time, the number of postal deliveries per day was reduced from two to one. There was still much opposition to conscription to the Vietnam War, and demos, often violent, were everywhere all the time. One operation in Vietnam saw 20 Australian 20-year-old youths, silly, rascally and lovable, killed in just a few days. The new Prime Minister, John Gorton, announced that no extra troops would be sent to Vietnam. The casino in Tasmania was approved, so visiting there became a gamble.  We won a small pot of Gold at the Olympics, Lionel Rose became the first Aboriginal to become a World Boxing Champion, and poet Dorothea Mackellar died at the age of 82.

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